Skip to main content
North Hampshire | info.northhampshire@sandler.com
 

This website uses cookies to offer you a better browsing experience.

Professional Development

A few years ago, we published a blog detailing how to maintain progress towards your new year’s resolutions. With the start of 2018 upon us, it’s a good time to revisit these tips and see how else we can help drive you to success.

In the blog post, Dave shared the importance of holding yourself accountable, partnering up for solidarity, turning your goals into a competition, finding a mentor to support you, and effectively executing your sales process.

While all of these tips are important, I want to share a few other insights that I’ve gained over my years as a Sandler trainer.

 

The biggest turning point in my career and in my personal life came when I realized my true value. When I broke through the mental barrier of self-imposed doubt, I truly began to shine. This breakthrough led me down the successful career path I have followed today, and it started with a change in focus.

All high-performing salespeople understand and consistently execute the top 10 behaviors necessary for success, which we outlined in our new Sandler book, The Sales Coach’s Playbook. Here are the top ten questions I utilize when helping salespeople benchmark and raise their performance:

As organizations grow, they realize that there are numerous different ways to define success. A new business, for example, will be immensely satisfied the first year the operation returns a profit. On the other hand, a more established company may expect to see a specified rate of growth year over year. Defining what success means to you and establishing goals based upon these criteria can be an important step in monitoring your business’s development and making productive decisions based on the criteria that matter the most to you.

Recently, you probably invested a lot of time and energy putting together a presentation of your product or service. You crafted your presentation, dotted all the “i”s, crossed all the “t”s, covered all the bases, and answered all of the prospect’s questions. But, instead of a buying decision, you only received a stall, a put-off, or a request for some concession. At whom do you point the finger of blame?

Salespeople invest time developing their pitch, formulating questions, and preparing responses to expected questions and objections from the prospect. They rehearse, refine, and rehearse some more.

All salespeople with a small amount of experience have a 30-second commercial (a.k.a elevator pitch, popcorn introduction, etc.) down pat. And that’s the problem.

Has this ever happened to you? You’ve had a series of great discussions with a prospect, taken lots of great notes, and you’ve developed the proverbial “killer presentation.

Are you a baby boomer manager? Have you figured out that the way you were motivated simply doesn’t work with today’s sales professionals?

Sales Training will incorporate the latest technological improvements in Multimedia and Internet/Intranet-based training methodology. Salespeople are as computer literate as ever and have access to computers fast enough to benefit from training software programs.

We encourage organisations to look at their people in three categories, ‘Gainers, Maintainers and Complainers.’ Whilst not specifically devised to describe members of sales teams, anyone who has ever been a member of a sales team will think it was. Here’s a quick rundown on these three groups.

How often have you listened as someone rationalised his or her mishandling of a problem by externalising its source: “I can’t meet my projections because . . .,” “My sector isn’t large enough,” or “Our prices are too high?”

Recently I was talking with a good friend of mine. I shared my experience at a local car dealership and raved about the excellent service I had received. Everything was exceptional.

Has this ever happened to you? A seemingly “hot prospect” asks you a question that seems to signal interest in working with you. (For example: “How strict are you with quantity discounts?”) You’ve been taught to respond immediately to “buying signals,” and you’re sure you just got one. So you answer the question – at length and with sufficient thoroughness to resolve all past, present, or future ambiguity on the subject. Your contact nods and smiles. Then, for some mysterious reason, your “hot prospect” disengages.

Communicating in the office is like playing the children’s game of telephone. You say one thing, yet by the time the message reaches all the people involved, everything can change, from the actual words to the tone and intention behind them. Effective communication plays one of the biggest roles in a functional work environment, but the ability to interact well with one's peers is one of the hardest skills to master. Develop stronger relationships with your coworkers using these seven tips to improve your professional communication skills.

Many people find it surprising that no one owns “DISC”. It is a theory that was originally developed in 1928 by William Moulton Marston. The DISC-model is in public domain and there are a few companies that have created their proprietary DISC assessments.

Learning the DISC model is fun, insightful and interesting. Everyone wants to understand why others are different. Who doesn’t like to read about the most important person in the world? It’s me! It’s no wonder DISC is so popular.

Recently I was talking with my client Jack, who had questions about the D-styles. He asked me if there were any softer descriptors for them than words such as “direct,” “independent” and “fast-paced.” Apparently a few of the D-style attendees in Jack’s training sessions expressed concern that others may perceive these descriptors negatively within the organisation. They did not want to appear to be abrasive, difficult or not supportive as a team player.

The dread of Monday morning and returning to work has become such a part of the average employee’s experience that the concept has become cliché. Working to change that seemingly universal expression of displeasure by creating a positive work environment has the power to not only improve the atmosphere, but also drive the business forward, encouraging innovation and productivity. In the spirit of March and 'expect success' month, here is what all professionals should know about the power of positive thinking in the workplace.

You might reason that with the appropriate education, training, direction, and encouragement, any one of your sales team members can become a top performer—a “superstar.”

Most people have one thing in common: the desire to “do better.” Of course, “doing better” means different things to different people. For some salespeople, it means closing more sales. For others, it means closing bigger sales. And there are salespeople for whom it means working less hard…or simply working less.

Guest post by David Mattson and Brian Sullivan authors of Sandler Enterprise Selling: Winning, Growing and Retaining Major Accounts

Stress is a natural response of the body to challenge, fear, attack, excitement and other external stimuli that gets our heart racing and the blood vessels pumping.

In a study of 20,000 people across industries and organizations I’ve found that the number one thing that people want from leaders is respect. It trumped recognition and appreciation, communicating an inspiring vision, providing useful feedback — even opportunities for learning, growth, and development.

Everyone who uses LinkedIn has a connection philosophy, though some people probably would have a hard time describing their philosophy in words. Maybe you’re one of those people who aren’t sure what your connection philosophy is. For those of you who sell for a living, we want to suggest that you make a conscious choice to adopt a connection philosophy that supports both you and your organization.

Your employees work for you because working for you helps them reach their personal goals faster than working for someone else.

According to Entrepreneur, we receive 193.3 billion emails every day. On average, that means each person's inbox is hit by about 120 emails a day – with some people receiving less and some receiving many more. Breaking through to your target audience when you're up against such odds can be tough. Even with all the inbox competition, email marketing can be quite lucrative when handled correctly. The foundation of strong performance with email marketing is content – from the subject line to the body of your email, you have to be concise and persuasive.

Creating success in sales requires energy, skill, commitment, and organization. Clients, vendors, sales representatives, and products fill up most of your time, leaving few minutes each day to organize yourself and clear the clutter from your desk or mind. January is “get organized month,” but busy sales representatives and managers can’t devote an entire day to administrative tasks without losing potential profits. Here are seven ways you can create organization to drive success in ten-minute increments any day of the year.

As the weather heats up, many companies begin to look with dread upon the impending summer slowdown. For brands unprepared for the upcoming lull, it can be a challenge to keep the company moving forward and productive during the summer months. With people in and out of the door due to vacations and time off, it can feel impossible to get anything done.

The strengths of your DISC-style can hinder your success. Learn skills to capitalize on your style’s strengths while working on your development areas.

Imagine that there are four sales professionals standing in front of you, all of them with records of success. On paper, they all look outstanding. One of them is going to end up closing a six-figure sale with your company today. After watching their body language for a few minutes before presentations start, you can already tell that you're not likely to work with salespersons #1 and #3. These two people won't make eye contact; in fact, they seem to work hard to avoid it. They keep shifting on their feet, and #3 mops the sweat off his brow every few minutes. They talk at you (not to you), detailing the minutiae of their products. Clearly they’re more comfortable with their product than they are people.

Are lawyers also salespeople?

If you asked one of them directly, they’d likely scrunch up their face as if they’d just heard an awful verdict from the bench.

But the truth is in this day and age the legal profession is as competitive as any other (if not more so) for new business. Why do you think that every non-profit board contains, at least, one lawyer? It’s likely just not out of the goodness of their collective hearts.

Your meeting date and time has been established. You’re confident your product or service is superior to your competitors. Your goal for the meeting is to convince the prospect. You’ve planned to be there for 45 minutes.

In regards to your business, the expertise you have gained over the years is completely worthless… until someone gives you money for it. If you have a medical doctorate, all you really have is a bunch of student loans until you have patients, and get paid for your knowledge.

Here is the problem: 99% of people out there are already doing what they think is in their best interest. Of course, there’s the 1% who hate themselves and are self-sabotaging, but for the most part, you are probably doing right now, what you think is best. But why is that a problem?

Well, if you want to achieve a higher level of success or happiness, no matter your current level, you are going to run into a problem.

David Sandler found three areas where people get stuck in their growth and development: Attitude, Behaviour, Technique

Over time, every successful salesperson comes to the conclusion that having the proper selling posture during the sales interview is critical. Many sales people are still struggling to understand this concept.

When we talk about posture, we are talking about the attitude reflected in the communication of the salesperson. We know that the message we send in our communication is made up of our body language, our tonality, and our words. However, how we mix those three elements creates a particular attitude that is palpable to our receiver.

There are three primary language postures.

In the theatre, the “fourth wall” is the wall between the actors and the audience. Behind this wall, the world of the actors is exactly as the audience imagines it. The good guys and the bad guys all fit within the story being told. If the fourth wall is “broken” the audience is directly acknowledged theThe Fourth Wall of Business management spell is broken. Once broken, the fourth wall is hard to reconstruct and the audience may not be happy. Think of Jean Valjean in Les Miserables during first act, turning to the audience and speaking in a normal, loud Brooklyn accent, “Yo, could you get off the cell phone? I’m trying to work here!”

In today’s environment, we have to stop acting and looking like beggars with briefcases and begin to recognise that the name of the game is taking business away from our competitors. Let the others wrestle it out at the procurement department and with the low-level influencers.